Advances in Social Behavior Research

Advances in Social Behavior Research

Vol. 3, 03 March 2023


Open Access | Article

Whether Acquiescence Constitutes the Principle of Estoppel in Territorial Dispute Cases: Case of Temple of Preah Vihear as an Example

Kezheng Zhang * 1
1 Institute of Intellectual Property Rights, Xiamen University, No. 422 South Siming Street, Xiamen, China

* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

Advances in Social Behavior Research, Vol. 3, 457-461 Advances in Social Behavior Research,
Published 03 March 2023. © 2023 The Author(s). Published by EWA Publishing
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Citation Kezheng Zhang. Whether Acquiescence Constitutes the Principle of Estoppel in Territorial Dispute Cases: Case of Temple of Preah Vihear as an Example. LNEP (2023) Vol. 3: 457-461. DOI: 10.54254/2753-7048/3/2022525.

Abstract

The principle of estoppel and acquiescence are widely applicated in territorial disputes. In some cases, acquiescence can lead to estoppel, but the specific criteria for its application still need further clarification. Otherwise, the abuse of estoppel followed by acquiescence might result in a violation of the sovereignty of other States. In this study, we focused on the case of Temple of Preah Vihear to gain a more extensive understanding about the prerequisites of that acquiescence constitutes estoppel in territorial disputes, and we concluded the basic conditions that acquiescence acts might lead to estopple through other relevant cases and literatures.

Keywords

Acquiescence., Territorial Dispute, International Law, Estoppel

References

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Data Availability

The datasets used and/or analyzed during the current study will be available from the authors upon reasonable request.

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